About the Assemblage, Inspiration for Making Art, My process, New Art

Transforming stuff: a process

Building assemblages requires a lot of stuff, stuff I collect at estate and garage sales, stuff friends give me when they’re cleaning out closets, stuff I find at my local recycling store, and even the stuff from my own kitchen drawers. Assemblage-building requires a good inventory of flotsam and jetsam, and there’s never quite enough.

foundobjects-lo    18447 book-Detail-

I’d recently collected several vintage books, one entitled When Yesterday Was Young. It became the “starter dough” for this three-dimensional piece. The doll parts made me think of childhood. I found two small wooden boxes, one a little larger than the other. The smaller one fit perfectly on top, and has such lovely dovetailed corners; I knew I had to use it. The doll’s head would fit great on top (with an armature for invisible support), but her long tresses had to go. A pearly pin became a tiara atop the new shorn hairdo that fit my vision. 18447flowers-Detail-To draw attention to the wonderful expression on the face, I created a background of sorts using part of a man’s paisley tie. Some things you can’t explain.

 

 

 

 

18447 heartprincessdetail

A heart-shaped box fit perfectly inside the bottom box. To further the idea of childhood dreams the book title hints at, I attached a smaller “princess” doll’s head inside and surrounded it with some dreamy vintage crocheted lace. The smaller box on top became a framed shadow box for some lovely flowers from an old costume jewelry piece. I attached red disks from an abacus-like toy to a dowel I had painted; this nicely filled the space between the top and bottom boxes. With boxes and book secured to each other, I painted a striped pattern around the front edge of the bottom box, relating it to the striped dowel and adding visual interest.

18447 marble-Detail-

I constructed armatures for the doll’s arms to secure them. Once attached, the arms begged to hold something. The large vintage marble in the right hand reminded me of the earth—big blue marble and all–and the sense of holding the future. That pleased me a lot! But the left hand needed something too; empty just didn’t feel right. My search ended when I found a little metal heart that may have been part of a necklace. It speaks of childlike love, open and ready to share.

18447 heartinhand-Detail

You can see the completed assemblage here.

I hope you’ve enjoyed learning how this piece came about. The process may sound simple, but it’s not nearly as clear-cut as it seems. There’s a lot of searching and digging for compatible and meaningful pieces that contribute to the concept. Sometimes a piece will stay incomplete on my workbench until the next step reveals itself, which may take days or even weeks. But it’s the discovery and surprises inherent in creating this type of work that make it so satisfying to my artist’s heart.

Join me on Facebook and Instagram for behind-the-scenes peeks and first postings of new work.

All art is copyrighted and may not be reproduced without express written permission. Copyright 2018 Laura Hunt

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standard
My process

Beyond brushes

A stash of brushes, an oval-shaped palette and a pile of rags—they’re some of the time-tested tools that have served artists superbly over the centuries. I don’t see that changing. There will always be painters whose work style, preferred process or desired results make the traditionally-equipped tool kit an absolute necessity, and the culture is better for it.

Then there are artists who can’t help but depart from convention, whose drive to experiment leads them to unconventional tools. Although standard brushes and canvases are very much a part of my own reservoir, I’m drawn to many of the effects achieved with non-standard implements. I’ll share some of them with you today.

Cardboard scrapers

cardboardscrapers-wp    scraperexample-wp

Rectangles of various widths with their corrugated edges can create some juicy paint effects. I like to lay down squirts of two or three different colors, then scrape them across the surface I’m working on. It’s where the colors intermingle that the magic happens.

Squeeze bottles

squeezebottles-wp    squeezebottleexample-wp

(See finished painting here.)

Squeeze bottles–they’re not just for catsup any more. I use them to create long sweeping arcs and curves; sometimes I get a serendipitous splat when the bottle is almost empty. Recently I’ve produced my paint splatters with squeeze bottles and a quick flip of the wrist. There’s a degree of tension between control of the tool and not-so-much control: accidents can—and do—happen. But if you’ve learned to expect it, is it really an accident?

Cheap combs and picks

combs-wp    combtextureexample-wp

(Click here to see the completed work begun above right.)

Texture is a key component of my work. I lay down my favorite texture goo, and before it dries, I use one or more of these combs from the dollar store to make impressions and marks that support the vision. They’re great for making concentric arcs, parallel grooves, and crosshatch patterns.

Paint rollers

roller-wp    rollerexample-wp

There’s nothing like a paint roller for covering a surface quickly! The example above right is one step past laying down the background, but suffice it to say, the three 24-inch square canvases required a lot of paint for good coverage. My three-inch wide roller helped make short work of the background. I’ve even used it in a similar way to the cardboard scrapers by laying down two or three different paint colors and rolling over them to achieve some interesting blends.

I’m always on the lookout for my next “off-label” art tool or material. It’s just one of the things that keeps my studio practice exciting for me. Art should be surprising—for the viewer and the artist as well.

Join me on Facebook and Instagram for behind-the-scenes peeks and first postings of new work.

All art is copyrighted and may not be reproduced without express written permission. Copyright 2017-2018 Laura Hunt

 

 

Standard
About the Painting, Art and words, poem and painting

About Tsunami: a verse

17391 Tsunami-lo-sm

Click on image for details of this painting.

deluge / rush of woe
tosses life about
with floods of doubt / grief / struggle

for this / the craftsman builds
a boat / worthy of the sea

Copyright 2018 Laura Hunt

Join me on Facebook and Instagram for behind-the-scenes peeks and first postings of new work.

All art is copyrighted and may not be reproduced without express written permission. Copyright 2017-2018 Laura Hunt
Standard
About the Painting, Art and words, Body of Work

The pairing of painting and poem

Where did this thought originate? Possibly from my recent acceptance into the Art & Words Collaborative Show in which the visual artists create a new work responding to a chosen written work, while the wordsmiths write a new piece responding to a selected visual work. So the idea may have come from that.

Or the thought could have bubbled up out of a webinar about the power of words, especially titles and artist’s statements, to connect viewer with art. Likely though, it was a mental mashup of the two experiences with whatever else was churning in my mind’s recesses–the need to examine more deeply the meaning of my own work. What resulted was a few sparse lines of free verse to usher passage into the heart of the piece.

After completing several small paintings, I took the time to really absorb them into my being, a wholly different act than painting. And although the purpose was to reach inside myself more profoundly, I hope the written lines may also help you, the viewer, to connect with the work as well. If each poem stands on its own, I’ll accept it as a bonus and a gift. Whether I make this a permanent part of my studio practice remains to be seen, but at this moment, the call to reflection resounds in my ears.

Here’s the first pairing of poem and painting. I hope you enjoy it.

Quiet Value

tender orbs dangle
above shaded earth
a flash of worth
stored in a fecund pod

Copyright 2018 Laura Hunt

Join me on Facebook and Instagram for behind-the-scenes peeks and first postings of new work.

All art is copyrighted and may not be reproduced without express written permission. Copyright 2018 Laura Hunt

 

Standard
Body of Work, Pattern in art

Pattern and surprise

Lately I’ve been thinking quite a lot about pattern. I’ve noticed that even from my earliest art-making days, pattern has often appeared to one degree or another. Why? Is it me? Is there some sort of OCD compulsion within that drives me to make rows of dots or spirals or zigzags? Or is there a universal human need for pattern?

I needed to find a clear definition of pattern. Turns out there are many, but out of the eleven I found in Mirriam-Webster, this is the one I found most relevant:

a reliable sample of traits, acts, tendencies, or other observable characteristics of a person, group, or institution: a behavior pattern, spending patterns, the prevailing pattern of speech

Searching a little further, I found this one on Wikipedia:

A pattern is a discernible regularity in the world or in a manmade design. As such, the elements of a pattern repeat in a predictable manner.

Pattern is all around us, in both tangible and intangible forms. Calendars and clocks help us organize our lives. Music and speech depend on the repetition of elements to make sense of sound and language. Research data looks for behavior patterns in humans, plants and animals to make predictions or to analyze the world around us.

Order and predictability are positive aspects of both our personal daily lives and of society at large–to a certain degree. When every day is the same, don’t we long for an interruption, a break, a surprise? Aren’t unbroken patterns with no variety excruciatingly boring? As a lover of order and pattern, how–and why– does that manifest itself in my art?

17393 Parallax-OriginalConfig-thumb-wp  17413 Child Bearer-Front-thumb-wp  16343 WarmingUp-thumb-wp  17384 BirdsOnAWetLawn-thumb

Click on images to see larger versions.
Above left: Seeming random lines for a pattern that streaks across a quad of canvases.
Second from left. Dots, stripes and zigzags lend a primitive character to this assemblage.
Third from left. A rectangle filled with rows and columns of dots interrupts a pattern of horizontal stripes.
Right. Variations of mostly green horizontal lines support the row of birds while splatters of color invade on the regularity of the composition.

I’ve reached a fairly simple self-analysis. I have a need for the pleasure that rendering a pattern affords. There’s a meditative quality to it. I like a degree of reliability. Pattern is a useful tool in bringing about order in a chaotic world. Making patterns and viewing them makes me feel safe and secure, but energized as well. (Polka dots may be predictable, but oh boy, do they enliven a surface!) I resist the idea of highly mechanical, robotic patterns though, and always see a human, handmade essence with mistakes and irregularities within the repetition of visual elements. And I need more than just the variation that my human hand naturally produces; I need a surprise of some kind, whether subtle or dramatic. Placing an organic shape like a human face over a background of squares and spirals is one type of surprise. Flinging paint splatters across the canvas over a pattern of criss-crossed lines is another.

18434 Ariose-thumb-wp    18429 String Theory K-thumb-wp

Click on images to see larger versions.

I’ve gained some clarity of my work and my practice as a space where discipline and spontaneity clash to produce unique objects that enrich and interpret the human experience. While the need for pattern may be especially strong in me, I believe that the visual expression of it strikes an unspoken universal chord in many who view it as well.

Join me on Facebook and Instagram for behind-the-scenes peeks and first postings of new work.

All art is copyrighted and may not be reproduced without express written permission. Copyright 2016-2018 Laura Hunt

 

Standard
About the Painting, Body of Work, Inspiration for Making Art

The place of ideas

The concept for a new painting often arises out of the piece I am currently working on. Completing a painting that features the very stable, quiet and calming forces of horizontal marks generates thoughts about a more motion-filled and cacophonous design, with criss-crossing and arcing lines. (Click on images to see larger versions.)

17384 BirdsOnAWetLawn-thumb 17417 Slightly Ebullient-thumb-wp

Or it may give birth to ideas on how to push the same concept even further. A painting that in its final stages partially overcomes the background may set me toward thinking of a more open, airy design—or other ways of using the background to influence what happens at the end. A black background creates a completely different experience than a white one, and I like to test them both.

17385 DoveInMourning-lo-thumb-wp 17387 APenny'sWorthOfSparrows-lo-thumb-wp

Color does a lot of heavy lifting in communicating the emotional tone of a work, so I’m sometimes drawn to pulling from a different part of the color spectrum for a subsequent piece. Maybe the last piece I completed incorporated reds and oranges for a hot and fiery mood that generates excitement. The follow-up might be a larger painting with a similar color palette, with the larger canvas encouraging an even bolder approach. But it could also mean that cool, quiet blues and greens form the basis for the next work. I followed Fire Dance, for example, with Tsunami.

17390 FireDance-OriginalConfig-thumb 17391 Tsunami-thumb-wp

I’m not saying that external stimulation doesn’t generate ideas for paintings—it certainly does. Trips to museums, shows, galleries and even a YouTube video session often create a whirlwind of concepts that might eventually make their way into my work. But even so, they must go through an internal blender—no, not a blender—more of a butter churn–before they feel authentic to me.

Truly, ideas come from a deep and infinite universe, both the observable one of nature, objects and humanity, and the invisible one of the heart, the emotions and the intellect—and ultimately from the Creator who has embedded deep within us the power to create.

Join me on Facebook and Instagram for behind-the-scenes peeks and first postings of new work.

All art is copyrighted and may not be reproduced without express written permission. Copyright 2017 Laura Hunt

 

 

 

Standard
Body of Work, Inspiration for Making Art, sketchbook

30 days, 30 faces

In my last blog post, “Going small: a wee little personal project,” I described a self-imposed challenge of populating a small blank book with faces. I committed to drawing 30 faces in 30 days. By then I had a week’s worth of sketches.

I had 23 faces to go. Twenty-three days in which I had to find just a few minutes to play. (Okay, I’ll admit, there were a couple days when I just plain forgot, so I doubled up the next. Commitment is commitment, you know.) And while drawing a face a day isn’t required to be functional in the world, I did come to see it as a form of self-care–care of my artist’s spirit, care and nurturing of my own imagination.

How will today’s face be different from yesterday’s? Will it be the set of the eyes, the texture of the hair, the turn of the lips, the skin color pale or dark, the tilt of the nose? Nature, nurture and life bestow their imprints on our faces in myriad ways. That uniqueness is the most obvious way we recognize one another, but we make little conscious note of it.

Since I used no reference for the sketches, I don’t consider them to be portraits at all. I’m an abstract and assemblage artist, not a portrait or figurative artist. Any resemblance to real persons is totally accidental and unintended. Except for one, which I’m sure you will notice as you flip through the images. Using colored pencils, a medium I hadn’t worked with in many years, was as enjoyable as I remembered. My colored pencils are ancient! Some colors are down to nubs, so I’ve rewarded myself with a new set. Here is the completed 30-day project.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A few random conclusions:

  • Humanity abounds with infinite variety.
  • Filling up this little book with cohesive yet playful drawings proved quite satisfying.
  • Imagination is a valuable asset. To keep it alive, it’s essential to give it a workout.
  • I hope to be more intentional in my observation of the faces that touch my life.

After a break, I’ll give myself another 30-day assignment, something different from this one, but one that stimulates my imagination–and helps fill up that book in meaningful ways. I’ll let you know about it when the time comes.

Join me on Facebook and Instagram for behind-the-scenes peeks and first postings of new work.

All art is copyrighted (except for that one I alluded to in the fourth paragraph) and may not be reproduced without express written permission. Copyright 2018 Laura Hunt

 

Standard